My supplier assures me that my product complies with overseas requirements and will meet local requirements. Is this sufficient for me to legally supply the products in Australia?


Answer

You should always check with your supplier that the product complies and that it has been assessed against local requirements. Ask the supplier to provide copies of current test certificates from an accredited or recognised test house.

If you are unsure, you should arrange to have the product tested yourself, preferably using a test house accredited to test to the specific standard.

via My supplier assures me that my product complies with overseas requirements and will meet local requirements. Is this sufficient for me to legally supply the products in Australia?.

Proposed ban notice: Permanent ban on small, high-powered magnets


SUMMARY OF THE REASONS FOR THE PROPOSED IMPOSITION OF A PERMANENT BAN ON SMALL, HIGH POWERED MAGNETS

The products of concern are small, high powered magnets which are generally supplied as aggregated masses to adults as novelty products for use by adults to create patterns and build shapes or which can be rearranged into different sizes and shapes or as jewellery for use in or around the mouth. These products are readily accessible from internet websites and a small number of retailers.

If any person ingests more than one of these high powered magnets, the magnets can be attracted to each other across the walls of the intestine or other digestive tissue creating the risk of perforation and other serious health conditions and, in some cases, death. There have been numerous incidents involving injury and at least one fatality reported in Australia following ingestion of these products.

The magnets appear innocuous and those about 5 mm in size may be potentially mistaken for small ball bearings or cake decoration confectionery. Warnings on packaging are likely to be insufficient and/or ineffective because once the product is removed from its packaging, the magnets themselves carry no warning.

Accordingly, it appears that swallowing these magnets is a reasonably foreseeable misuse of these products which may cause injury, including the risk of blockage, perforation, blood poisoning and in some cases, death.

via Proposed ban notice: Permanent ban on small, high-powered magnets.

IBM claims spintronics memory breakthrough | Computerworld New Zealand


IBM scientists used ultra short laser pulses to monitor the evolution of thousands of electron spins that were created simultaneously in a very small spot, said Gian Salis, co-author of the Nature paper and a scientist in the Physics of Nanoscale Systems research group at IBM Research.Usually, such spins find electrons randomly rotating and quickly losing their orientation. In this study, IBM and ETH researchers found, for the first time, how to arrange the spins neatly into a regular stripe-like pattern – the so-called persistent spin helix.

via IBM claims spintronics memory breakthrough | Computerworld New Zealand.

Generating terahertz on silicon chips :: ElectronicsOnline


Current methods of generating terahertz radiation involve lasers, thermionic valves and special circuits cooled near absolute zero, often in room-sized apparatuses costing thousands of dollars.

Cornell researchers with Ehsan Afshari, assistant professor of electrical and computer engineering, have developed a new method using the familiar and inexpensive CMOS chip technology, generating power levels high enough for some medical applications.

via Generating terahertz on silicon chips :: ElectronicsOnline.

Laser that could speed computer performance :: ElectronicsOnline


“It is truly an interdisciplinary team effort,” Zhou says. “The co-existence of photonics with electronics on the chip level shall enable multifunctional, energy-efficient super-chips for applications in computing, communications, sensing, imaging and so on.”

via Laser that could speed computer performance :: ElectronicsOnline.

ACCC launches Recalls Australia app for Android


The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission has launched an Android version of its Recalls Australia app to provide easily accessible information on recalled consumer goods

via ACCC launches recalls app for Android.

The app is based on data from the ACCC’s Recalls Australia website – www.recalls.gov.au – and is available from the Google Play store at no cost. The ACCC will also shortly release a mobile friendly version of the website.

You can also find out about product safety issues online via the Product Safety Australia website www.productsafety.gov.au, Twitter (@ProductSafetyAU), Facebook (ACCC Product Safety) and a dedicated ACCC Product Safety YouTube Channel.

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