Apple AC Wall Plug Adapter Recall (reminder)


UPDATE NOTE: This is an older recall, going back to 2016. If you have already participated in the recall then further action is not necessary.

“Apple has determined that, in very rare cases, the two prong Apple AC wall plug adapters designed for use in Continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Argentina and Brazil may break and create a risk of electrical shock if touched. These wall plug adapters shipped from 2003 to 2015 with Mac and certain iOS devices, and were also included in the Apple World Travel Adapter Kit.”

“This recall covers the two prong plug portion of the Apple AC power supply (wall plug adapters) designed for use in Continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, South Korea and Brazil.”

“Apple’s website advises that in very rare cases, the two prong wall plugs designed for continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Argentina and Brazil can break and create a shock hazard. So the company will exchange the part at no charge. “

Clean Energy Council home battery assurance program – Electrical connection


A new Battery Assurance Program developed by the Clean Energy Council provides consumers with independent information on the safety of home battery products…

The new program confirms which home battery products have been tested against the industry’s best practice guidelines… Products that qualify for the Battery Assurance Program … have been independently tested to confirm they are up to the necessary electrical safety and quality standards.

Source: Clean Energy Council launches home battery program – Electrical connection

The New Australian Regulatory Compliance Mark


The RCM is now mandatory for electrical safety in Australia and New Zealand On March 1, 2013, Australia’s Regulatory Compliance Mark (RCM) commenced the transition to replace the C-tick and A-tick …

Source: The New Australian Regulatory Compliance Mark

ACMA – RCM – end of transition period approaching


The single Regulatory Compliance Mark (RCM) was introduced on 1 March 2013 with a three-year transition period to 29 February 2016.

The RCM illustrates a product’s compliance with all applicable ACMA standards—telecommunications, radiocommunications, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and electromagnetic energy (EME).

Suppliers must register on the online national database and start using the RCM by 1 March 2016.

Products that have already been labelled with the C-Tick or A-Tick can continue to be supplied until labelled stock has been exhausted.

Source: Single compliance mark—end of transition period approaching!

LED globes & TV reception interference | ACMA


Some models of (imported) LED light globes cause interference to TV signals. This interference may consist of a sudden loss of signal or picture quality in a residence or neighbouring house. In these cases, the ACMA needs to be able to quickly contact the supplier of the globes to notify them of the problem. People experiencing TV reception problems may also wish to contact the supplier to arrange an exchange or refund.

The consequences of supplying a device that does not comply with Australian law can be serious and may risk your business’s reputation. Taking some simple steps before making a bulk purchase of LED globes (or any electronic device) directly from overseas will help prevent interference.

via LED globes & TV reception | ACMA.

ACCC Webinar recording – Sourcing Safe Products, 12 May 2015


Sourcing safe products is a responsibility that all suppliers must meet. This webinar is aimed at businesses that supply products within the Australian marketplace and want more information on their responsibilities when sourcing products for their consumers.

via Webinar – Registration.

Australia: Safety guidance on concentrations of particular chemicals in certain consumer goods


The ACCC has published guidance on safe concentrations of particular chemicals in consumer goods. The guidance prescribes concentrations of chemicals, below which a safety concern does not exist. It includes a list of 22 hazardous aromatic amines which can be derived from certain hazardous azo dyes in clothing, textiles and leather articles. Guidance is also provided for safe concentrations of formaldehyde in clothing and textiles.

via Safety guidance on concentrations of particular chemicals in certain consumer goods.

21st October 2014

Second knock-off USB charger explodes


She bought the knock-off charger for $10 from Paddy’s Markets as a gift for her son Daniel on his 14th birthday last Sunday but, by Monday evening, the device was a blackened wreck.

Ms Sommerville, from Kanahooka near Wollongong, said she heard a loud bang – ‘‘like metal hitting metal’’ – and saw a flash of light coming from Daniel’s room.

‘‘Daniel came out of his bedroom with a stunned look on his face. He said, ‘the charger’,’’ Ms Sommerville said.

‘‘The whole house smelt like gun powder. I was shocked.’’

The explosion caused the electricity supply to short circuit in three bedrooms, and at one of the loungeroom power points.

‘‘Who knows what would have happened if we didn’t have a circuit breaker,’’ Ms Sommerville said.

‘‘After hearing about the other woman that got killed by it, we’re really thinking how seriously lucky Daniel is.’’

via Second knock-off USB charger explodes.

Product safety & standards


  • Note: This article talks of Australian Product Safety laws and regulations, as they relate to the Australian Consumer Law (ACL) so is of general interest. However it doesn’t specifically cover safety of electrical equipment which is mandated under State laws. You can find the Electrical safety regulations information at http://www.erac.gov.au/ for the laws and regulations and regulators which supplement and complement the ACL for electrical safety.

Extract from the news article below:

If you sell products Australian customers, including the sale of products online, you must meet product safety requirements under Australian Consumer Law. If you’re a supplier or manufacturer, you are legally obligated to comply with mandatory Australian safety standards and only market safe products. Mandatory standards are law, and there are penalties and consequences for selling products that do not comply.

via Product safety & standards.

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