Apple AC Wall Plug Adapter Recall (reminder)


UPDATE NOTE: This is an older recall, going back to 2016. If you have already participated in the recall then further action is not necessary.

“Apple has determined that, in very rare cases, the two prong Apple AC wall plug adapters designed for use in Continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Argentina and Brazil may break and create a risk of electrical shock if touched. These wall plug adapters shipped from 2003 to 2015 with Mac and certain iOS devices, and were also included in the Apple World Travel Adapter Kit.”

“This recall covers the two prong plug portion of the Apple AC power supply (wall plug adapters) designed for use in Continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, South Korea and Brazil.”

“Apple’s website advises that in very rare cases, the two prong wall plugs designed for continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Argentina and Brazil can break and create a shock hazard. So the company will exchange the part at no charge. “

David Schwebel – product injury prevention through predicting child behaviour


Interview podcast and transcript with Professor David Schwebel of the University of Alabama on product injury prevention through predicting child behaviour.

“Children naturally learn about the world by trying things and therefore we have to assume that our products will be tried and explored and sometimes used improperly.”

Source: Podcast interview – David Schwebel – Product Safety Solutions

U.S. Lawsuit Against Samsung Claims Injuries from Galaxy 7 Explosion


Samsung Electronics Co. was sued on Friday by a Florida man who said he suffered severe burns after his Galaxy Note 7 smartphone exploded in his front pants pocket…

Source: U.S. Lawsuit Against Samsung Claims Injuries from Galaxy 7 Explosion

Report on Furniture Stability | Kids In Danger (USA)


A child dies from tipping furniture, appliances or TVs every two weeks. The statistics for tip-over incidents have grown over the last decade, yet there has been little reform to safety standards. [The] report, Furniture Stability: A review of data and testing  … analyzed data of dresser and chest tip-overs and revealed testing results for 19 furniture units. Findings of the data analysis include:

  • Two-year-olds are the age group most affected by tip-overs, and are most likely to be killed.
  • Head injuries (37%) were the most common category of injury.
  • Almost all (98.7%) of head injuries are related to a television tipping over on a child.

Source: KID and Shane’s Foundation Release Report on Furniture Stability | Kids In Danger

Travel warning: carriage of lithium ion batteries on aircraft


The Minister for Infrastructure and Transport Darren Chester issued a reminder to airline passengers to carefully consider items in their carry-on luggage after a lithium battery in a passenger’s carry-on bag caught fire at Sydney Airport.“ On this occasion the battery caught fire while the plane was on the ground and the issue was resolved. Whilst there was no damage to the aircraft, several passengers did report feeling ill.

Source: Travel warning: carriage of lithium ion batteries on aircraft

She woke in a pool of blood: hospital misdiagnosed baby who swallowed button battery, coroner hears


What we would give to have another chance to hear your voice, to feel your kiss and to see you grow,” wrote the Rees family in Isabella’s tribute.

At the age of one, Isabella swallowed a button battery. No one knows precisely when. It lodged in her oesophagus, and made her sick.

Her parents took her to hospital several times over two weeks, but staff didn’t pick up the presence of the battery until it was too late, the Coroners Court heard on Thursday.

She died in the morning of February, 4, 2015, from cardiac arrest, on the operating table at Sunshine Hospital.

Source: She woke in a pool of blood: hospital misdiagnosed baby who swallowed button battery, coroner hears

The New Australian Regulatory Compliance Mark


The RCM is now mandatory for electrical safety in Australia and New Zealand On March 1, 2013, Australia’s Regulatory Compliance Mark (RCM) commenced the transition to replace the C-tick and A-tick …

Source: The New Australian Regulatory Compliance Mark

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