Improving the Effectiveness of the Consumer Product Safety System (Australia)


The Commonwealth Treasury (Treasury) is undertaking this assessment and public consultation on behalf of the Commonwealth, states and territories. This Consultation Regulation Impact Statement (RIS) provides an overview of the current product safety system, explains identified problems and outlines some potential reform options for feedback, including options for a GSP.

See the link to obtain the document.

Closes 30 Nov 2019 (Opened 8 Oct 2019)

Source: Improving the Effectiveness of the Consumer Product Safety System – The Treasury – Citizen Space

Study Identifies Main Culprit Behind Lithium Metal Battery Failure


Researchers have discovered the root cause of why lithium metal batteries fail, challenging a long-held belief in the field. The study presents new ways to boost battery performance and brings research a step closer to incorporating lithium anodes into rechargeable batteries.

Source: Study Identifies Main Culprit Behind Lithium Metal Battery Failure

New website for EESS (Electrical Equipment Safety Scheme – Australia)


The new EESS website now stands alone to support regulatory activities across multiple states. The safety of household electrical equipment in Queensland, Victoria, Western Australia and Tasmania is regulated using the Electrical Equipment Safety System (EESS), which now has a new online presence at: http://www.EESS.gov.au.

EESS.gov.au removes functions previously found on the Electrical Regulatory Authorities Council (ERAC) website and presents them with enhanced and improved layout and structure, based on feedback from industry.

Source: New standalone website for EESS (Electrical Equipment Safety Scheme)

Apple AC Wall Plug Adapter Recall (reminder)


UPDATE NOTE: This is an older recall, going back to 2016. If you have already participated in the recall then further action is not necessary.

“Apple has determined that, in very rare cases, the two prong Apple AC wall plug adapters designed for use in Continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Argentina and Brazil may break and create a risk of electrical shock if touched. These wall plug adapters shipped from 2003 to 2015 with Mac and certain iOS devices, and were also included in the Apple World Travel Adapter Kit.”

“This recall covers the two prong plug portion of the Apple AC power supply (wall plug adapters) designed for use in Continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, South Korea and Brazil.”

“Apple’s website advises that in very rare cases, the two prong wall plugs designed for continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Argentina and Brazil can break and create a shock hazard. So the company will exchange the part at no charge. “

David Schwebel – product injury prevention through predicting child behaviour


Interview podcast and transcript with Professor David Schwebel of the University of Alabama on product injury prevention through predicting child behaviour.

“Children naturally learn about the world by trying things and therefore we have to assume that our products will be tried and explored and sometimes used improperly.”

Source: Podcast interview – David Schwebel – Product Safety Solutions

U.S. Lawsuit Against Samsung Claims Injuries from Galaxy 7 Explosion


Samsung Electronics Co. was sued on Friday by a Florida man who said he suffered severe burns after his Galaxy Note 7 smartphone exploded in his front pants pocket…

Source: U.S. Lawsuit Against Samsung Claims Injuries from Galaxy 7 Explosion

Report on Furniture Stability | Kids In Danger (USA)


A child dies from tipping furniture, appliances or TVs every two weeks. The statistics for tip-over incidents have grown over the last decade, yet there has been little reform to safety standards. [The] report, Furniture Stability: A review of data and testing  … analyzed data of dresser and chest tip-overs and revealed testing results for 19 furniture units. Findings of the data analysis include:

  • Two-year-olds are the age group most affected by tip-overs, and are most likely to be killed.
  • Head injuries (37%) were the most common category of injury.
  • Almost all (98.7%) of head injuries are related to a television tipping over on a child.

Source: KID and Shane’s Foundation Release Report on Furniture Stability | Kids In Danger

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