AS/NZS 3000:2018 (wiring rules) released


The 2018 edition of the Wiring Rules (AS/NZS 3000:2018) has now been released. You can purchase the new standard on the SAI Global’s website.

Some of the changes from the previous edition include:

  • new requirements for safety switches
  • enhanced requirements for MEN earthing systems, including bonding of pool structures and wet areas
  • increased mechanical protection for cables installed within a ceiling space
  • additional installation requirements for electrical appliances, accessories and equipment
  • enhanced safety requirements for electrical equipment installed in locations exposed to water
  • five new appendices:
    • continuity of supply for active assisted living
    • electrical conduits
    • installation of arc fault detection devices
    • guidance for the installation and location of electrical vehicle charging stations
    • DC circuit protection and switching devices.

Source: https://www.vision6.com.au/v/15149/1802717546/email.html?k=G5D9DMvjsotyBaNckJ2rmuVZTOH0MSr0MturTP8mwE8

The New Australian Regulatory Compliance Mark


The RCM is now mandatory for electrical safety in Australia and New Zealand On March 1, 2013, Australia’s Regulatory Compliance Mark (RCM) commenced the transition to replace the C-tick and A-tick …

Source: The New Australian Regulatory Compliance Mark

ACMA – RCM – end of transition period approaching


The single Regulatory Compliance Mark (RCM) was introduced on 1 March 2013 with a three-year transition period to 29 February 2016.

The RCM illustrates a product’s compliance with all applicable ACMA standards—telecommunications, radiocommunications, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) and electromagnetic energy (EME).

Suppliers must register on the online national database and start using the RCM by 1 March 2016.

Products that have already been labelled with the C-Tick or A-Tick can continue to be supplied until labelled stock has been exhausted.

Source: Single compliance mark—end of transition period approaching!

Recalls: Panasonic Australia Pty Ltd—Rechargeable Battery Pack CF-VZSU61U


What are the defects?

There is a risk that the rechargeable battery pack may overheat cause smoke or may ignite.

What are the hazards?

If the defect occurs, there is a risk of a fire or a burn hazard to consumers and to the CF-S10 Panasonic Toughbook Computer

Source: Panasonic Australia Pty Ltd—Rechargeable Battery Pack CF-VZSU61U

Apple AC Wall Plug Adapter Exchange Program


“Apple has determined that, in very rare cases, the two prong Apple AC wall plug adapters designed for use in Continental Europe, Australia, New Zealand, Korea, Argentina and Brazil may break and create a risk of electrical shock if touched. These wall plug adapters shipped from 2003 to 2015 with Mac and certain iOS devices, and were also included in the Apple World Travel Adapter Kit.”

See details at the Source: Apple AC Wall Plug Adapter Exchange Program – Apple Support

Australia Safety Recall: Microsoft Corporation—Microsoft AC Power Cordset for Surface Pro, Pro 2 & Selected Pro 3 Models


What are the defects?

The AC supply flexible cord of the cordset can fail at the entry to the appliance connector where it plugs into the power supply unit for the device, or at the entry to the power socket.

What are the hazards?

Risk of electric shock and fire.

Source: Microsoft Corporation—Microsoft AC Power Cordset for Surface Pro, Pro 2 & Selected Pro 3 Models

Australia: Safety guidance on concentrations of particular chemicals in certain consumer goods


The ACCC has published guidance on safe concentrations of particular chemicals in consumer goods. The guidance prescribes concentrations of chemicals, below which a safety concern does not exist. It includes a list of 22 hazardous aromatic amines which can be derived from certain hazardous azo dyes in clothing, textiles and leather articles. Guidance is also provided for safe concentrations of formaldehyde in clothing and textiles.

via Safety guidance on concentrations of particular chemicals in certain consumer goods.

21st October 2014

%d bloggers like this: